MISC

2011年9月5日

Brain mechanisms of flavor learning

Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
  • Takashi Yamamoto
  • ,
  • Kayoko Ueji

2011
記述言語
英語
掲載種別
書評論文,書評,文献紹介等
DOI
10.3389/fnsys.2011.00076

Once the flavor of the ingested food (conditioned stimulus, CS) is associated with a preferable (e.g., good taste or nutritive satisfaction) or aversive (e.g., malaise with displeasure) signal (unconditioned stimulus, US), animals react to its subsequent exposure by increasing or decreasing ingestion to the food. These two types of association learning (preference learning vs. aversion learning) are known as classical conditioned reactions which are basic learning and memory phenomena, leading selection of food and proper food intake. Since the perception of flavor is generated by interaction of taste and odor during food intake, taste and/or odor are mainly associated with bodily signals in the flavor learning. After briefly reviewing flavor learning in general, brain mechanisms of conditioned taste aversion is described in more detail. The CS-US association leading to long-term potentiation in the amygdala, especially in its basolateral nucleus, is the basis of establishment of conditioned taste aversion. The novelty of the CS detected by the cortical gustatory area may be supportive in CS-US association. After the association, CS input is conveyed through the amygdala to different brain regions including the hippocampus for contextual fear formation, to the supramammillary and thalamic paraventricular nuclei for stressful anxiety or memory dependent fearful or stressful emotion, to the reward system to induce aversive expression to the CS, or hedonic shift from positive to negative, and to the CS-responsive neurons in the gustatory system to enhance the responsiveness to facilitate to detect the harmful stimulus. © 2011 Yamamoto and Ueji.

リンク情報
DOI
https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2011.00076
ID情報
  • DOI : 10.3389/fnsys.2011.00076
  • ISSN : 1662-5137
  • SCOPUS ID : 84862908935

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