Papers

Peer-reviewed
7 2017

Changes in the interictal and early postictal diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance parameters in familial spontaneous epileptic cats

EPILEPSY RESEARCH
  • Yuji Hamamoto
  • ,
  • Daisuke Hasegawa
  • ,
  • Shunta Mizoguchi
  • ,
  • Yoshihiko Yu
  • ,
  • Masae Wada
  • ,
  • Takayuki Kuwabara
  • ,
  • Aki Fujiwara-Igarashi
  • ,
  • Michio Fujita

Volume
133
Number
First page
76
Last page
82
Language
English
Publishing type
Research paper (scientific journal)
DOI
10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2017.04.015
Publisher
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV

Objective: The familial spontaneous epileptic cat (FSEC) is thought to be a good genetic model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. In the current study, cerebral diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to confirm the functional deficit zone in the FSEC and evaluate the effect of a single seizure on different brain regions.
Methods: Six FSECs and six healthy control cats were used in this study. MRI was performed in the interictal state (resting state for control) and postictal state immediately after the vestibular stimulation-induced generalized epileptic seizure (control cats received the same stimulation as the FSECs). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy and perfusion parameters (i.e., relative regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and relative regional mean transit time (rMTT)) were measured in the hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, and gray and white matter.
Results: In the interictal state, the rCBV and rMTT in the hippocampus was significantly decreased in FSECs, compared to the control. In the postictal state, FSECs had a significantly decreased ADC and an increased rCBV, rCBF, and rMTT in the hippocampus, and an increased rMTT in the amygdala, compared to the interictal state.
Conclusion: This study showed that FSECs had interictal hypoperfusion in the hippocampus, and postictal hypodiffusion and hyperperfusion in the hippocampus and/or amygdala. These findings suggested that the hippocampus and/or amygdala act as the functional deficit and expanded seizure-onset zones in FSECs.

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Link information
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2017.04.015
PubMed
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28458103
Web of Science
https://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=JSTA_CEL&SrcApp=J_Gate_JST&DestLinkType=FullRecord&KeyUT=WOS:000403117700014&DestApp=WOS_CPL