MISC

1998年5月

Seismic activity and ground deformation associated with 1995 phreatic eruption of Kuju volcano, Kyushu, Japan

Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research
  • Yasuaki Sudo
  • ,
  • Hiroyasu Ono
  • ,
  • Anthony W. Hurst
  • ,
  • Tomoki Tsutsui
  • ,
  • Takehiko Mori
  • ,
  • Makoto Nakaboh
  • ,
  • Yoshihiro Matsumoto
  • ,
  • Mikio Sako
  • ,
  • Shin Yoshikawa
  • ,
  • Maki Tanaka
  • ,
  • Yoshimasa Kobayashi
  • ,
  • Takeshi Hashimoto
  • ,
  • Teruaki Hoka
  • ,
  • Toshihiro Yamada
  • ,
  • Hideharu Masuda
  • ,
  • Shigetomo Kikuchi

81
3-4
開始ページ
245
終了ページ
267
DOI
10.1016/S0377-0273(98)00011-0

Kuju Volcano lies near Aso Caldera in central Kyushu. After a few hundred years of dormancy, a phreatic eruption began with the ejection of about 20 000 m3 ash on 11 October 1995. A number of new vents have opened on a series of lines striking east-west on the eastern slope of Mt. Hossho, one of the domes of the Kuju complex, a few hundred meters from a pre-existing fumarolic area. After the eruption, there has been continuous steam emission from the new vents. There was the second ash eruption in December 1995. Before these eruptions, seismic events were rarely observed, either near the site of the new vents, or elsewhere under Kuju Volcano. In the nearly 2 years since the first eruption, several thousand earthquakes have been recorded. These events have been very horizontally concentrated just to the north of the new vents vertically between 800 m above sea level and 1000 m below sea level. Very few earthquakes have been located on the southern side of the new vents. There was clearly a strong high-frequency attenuation affecting the seismic waves which passed through the region beneath the new vents to the seismometers south of Mt Hossho. This evidence possibly indicates a thermal fluid content beneath the new vents, suggesting that there is a seismic attenuating zone in the feeding area of the new vents. Nearly all the earthquake spectra were of dominantly high-frequency, but the percentage of earthquakes with predominantly low-frequency spectra increased at times of enhanced volcanic activity. Volcanic tremors were also observed around the times of peak activity. Slope distance measurements have been made since the eruption. The main results of these measurements are a contraction of more than 200 ppm in distances between Mt Hossho and points further north. The significant distance changes occurred during seismic swarns. This indicated that the seismic activities influenced ground deformation, even though some of these swarms were 3 or 5 km from Mt Hossho. The slope distnace changes indicate that an area near the top of Mt Hossho has been moving to the northeast.

リンク情報
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/S0377-0273(98)00011-0
Scopus
https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=0031692805&origin=inward
Scopus Citedby
https://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=0031692805&origin=inward

エクスポート
BibTeX RIS